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Showing posts from February, 2011

White Rose

Brides (usually) wear white gowns with (usually) subtle textures. Capturing those textures is hard. Having a couple dozen white roses here (what I gave my daughter for Valentine's Day) I decided to do a little flash practice.

To bring out the texture of the rose, I knew I needed the light to be directional. The rose is lit by two flash units fired by radio triggers. The main flash was about 45º off the camera's axis to the right — and fairly close. Because the light was bounced off a wall right behind me, it was fairly soft. The secondary flash was bounced into a ceiling corner about 90º to the right and three times as far away.

The shot was taken hand-held at 1/160th sec. Little tricky, that, given the shallow depth of field here, but the Steady Shot feature of the Sony Alpha A580 helps.

Although I live across the street from the Dallas Arboretum and shoot there quite frequently, flowers are not my favorite subjects, in fact, I find flowers rather challenging. I'm reasonably…

Visual Acoustics: A film about Julius Shulman

This morning my wife and I watched the film Visual Acoustics, a documentary about the career of Julius Shulman.

http://www.juliusshulmanfilm.com/

Shulman is arguably (probably?) the greatest architectural photographer of all time, and he was a very great photographer indeed. He was also tremendously important, because what most of us know about beautiful or important architecture outside our own home towns comes from photos. The movie reckons that, for every one person who sees a great piece of architecture in person, eighty thousand know it through a photo.

The film is an absolute delight from start to finish and I recommend it highly. The central character is Shulman himself, still very active in his mid-nineties!

I want to mention a few details about the film that make it particularly interesting to photographers. Many films about photographers show the photos but say almost nothing about the technical issues involved in their making. This film isn't a lecture on technique, of cou…